Fun Facts: Candy

Candy & Chocolate

  • Less than two percent of the calories in the American diet are supplied by candy.
  • In Europe during the middle ages, the high cost of sugar made sugar candy a delicacy available only to the wealthy.
  • Candy is simply made by dissolving sugar in water. The different heating levels determine the types of candy: Hot temperatures make hard candy, medium heat will make soft candy and cool temperatures make chewy candy.
  • Germans consume twice as much candy as Americans.
  • 65% of American candy bars were introduced more than 50 years ago
  • The actual flavor of circus peanuts is banana
  • Gummy worms were introduced on July 15, 1981, the 50th anniversary of gummy bears.
  • A one-ounce piece of milk chocolate contains about the same amount of caffeine as a cup of decaffeinated coffee.
  • U.S. chocolate manufacturers currently use 40 percent of the almonds produced in the United States and 25 percent of domestic peanuts.

Gum

  • Chew gum until the sugar is gone to blow a bigger bubble. Sugar does not stretch and can cause the bubble to collapse early

Dryden & Palmer

  • Dates back to 1880 when rock candy enjoyed great popularity as a cough-cold remedy and delicious confection. In addition, vast amounts were used in salons. Every bar had its own creation of rock and rye to “cure their patrons’ colds” or at least make them forget they had a cold in the first place. Prohibition was not kind to the rock candy industry and of the original manufacturers, only Dryden & Palmer remains today.

Saltwater Taffy

  • Invented in Atlantic City in 1883.

Tootsie Rolls

  • Tootsie Rolls debuted in 1896, introduced by Leo Hirshfield of New York who named them after his daughter’s nickname, “Tootsie”.
  • Tootsie Rolls were added to soldiers’ rations during World War II due to their durability in all weather conditions.

Hershey

  • Milton Hershey of Lancaster, PA introduced the first Hershey milk chocolate bar in 1900.
  • Hershey’s Kisses appeared in their familiar foil wraps in 1906.

NECCO wafers

  • Pastel-colored candy disks called NECCO wafers first appeared in 1901 named for the acronym of the New England Confectionery Company.

Baby Ruth

  • The Baby Ruth candy bar was first sold in 1920, named for President Grover Cleveland’s daughter – not the famous baseball player.

Milky Way

  • The Milky Way Bar is the first of many candies to be introduced by the Mars family in 1923. It was created to taste like a malted milk that would be available anywhere, anytime.

Snickers Bar

  • M&M/Mars introduced the Snickers Bar in 1930. It was named for a favorite horse owned by the Mars family. It is the number-one selling candy bar in the U.S. today.

3 Musketeers Bar

  • M&M/Mars debuted the 3 Musketeers Bar in 1932. It was originally made as a three-flavor bar featuring chocolate, vanilla and strawberry nougat. In 1945, it was changed to all chocolate nougat.

M&M’s

  • These plain Chocolate Candies were introduced in 1941 in response to slack chocolate sales in summer.

Skittles

  • 200 million Skittles are produced each day.

Sugar Daddies

  • Sugar Daddies were originally called Papa Suckers.

Dum Dums

  • The sucker’s “mystery” flavor is always a mix of two flavors. It’s created when the machine switches to producing a new flavor.

 

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Request a Catalog

With more than 3,000 snacks in our product line, Tropical Foods is the ideal snack partner for your business.

Request a Catalog

Wholesale Contact

Contact us to become a retailer and offer the highest quality and boldest snacks to your customers.

Contact Us